OpenMedia

Stop the Secrecy

The Movement Gets Legs in San Diego: Weekly Update from OpenMedia.ca

Thu, 07/12/2012 - 00:00 -- Anonymous (not verified)

Hello!

Here's Lindsey with your update:

Last Saturday, over a thousand pages of StopTheTrap.net petition signatures were delivered to the TPP negotiations in San Diego! People around the world are taking a stand against the Internet trap build into the secretive TPP agreement. Together, we're making our voices heard! Be sure to spread the word about StopTheTrap.net today.

For the Internet, 

- The OpenMedia.ca Team


Recent News

New CRTC Chair Could Bring Change to Broken Internet Regulation

Jean Pierre Blais was recently appointed as the new chairman of the CRTC, a move which has many in the pro-Internet hopeful for a shift away from the misguided and harmful policymaking that we’ve seen in the last few years. The CRTC is responsible for regulating the Internet Traffic Management Practices (ITMPs) of Internet service providers, i.e. making sure that lawful content isn’t throttled. However York University professor David Ellis recently wrote two blog posts arguing that current CRTC policy encourages price-gouging and an uncompetitive Internet market, while its system for enforcing its own regulations is woefully inefficient.

In his first post, he highlights three major flaws in current policy that demonstrate a preference for ISPs over consumers: that it has no neutrality, no teeth, and no transparency.

The lack of neutrality in the CRTC’s policy is clear in the language of the 2009 ITMP report: ‘net neutrality’ (a consumer concern) is only mentioned once, whereas ‘traffic’ (a supplier concern) appears 73 times. Read more »

 

New CRTC Chair Could Bring Change to Broken Internet Regulation

Jean Pierre Blais was recently appointed as the new chairman of the CRTC, a move which has many in the pro-Internet hopeful for a shift away from the misguided and harmful policymaking that we’ve seen in the last few years. The CRTC is responsible for regulating the Internet Traffic Management Practices (ITMPs) of Internet service providers, i.e. making sure that lawful content isn’t throttled. However York University professor David Ellis recently wrote two blog posts arguing that current CRTC policy encourages price-gouging and an uncompetitive Internet market, while its system for enforcing its own regulations is woefully inefficient.

In his first post, he highlights three major flaws in current policy that demonstrate a preference for ISPs over consumers: that it has no neutrality, no teeth, and no transparency.

The lack of neutrality in the CRTC’s policy is clear in the language of the 2009 ITMP report: ‘net neutrality’ (a consumer concern) is only mentioned once, whereas ‘traffic’ (a supplier concern) appears 73 times. Read more »

 

The Globe and Mail: Bell seeks to use $40M of tangible public benefits to fund Northern expansion

Big Telecom company Bell wants to use public benefit funds to bankroll its expansion into Northern Canada. “For Bell Canada and its subsidiary to propose this to the CRTC is shameful. The funds related to the Astral acquisition are supposed to be used for the public good – not to feather their own nest,” said Cameron Zubko, vice-president of corporate development at independent provider Ice Wireless.

To be clear, they want buy up and control more of our media and they want to use the public benefit funds from that deal to unfairly compete in the North where new competitors are emerging. It’s time to restructure the telecom market and we have a well-researched crowdsourced plan that you can send to your MP at http://www.openmedia.ca/report.

Article by Rita Trichur and Simon Houpt for The Globe & Mail:

The latest hot spot in the telecom war is breaking out in Canada’s far north.

A plan by BCE Inc. to earmark $40-million of regulator-mandated spending to improve telecommunications services across the north has rivals complaining of an unfair cash grab that will stifle competition. Read more »

 

Nowak: Internet Prices Climbing With No End in Sight

Canadian wireless and broadband Internet prices are high by international standards. In the case of broadband, those high prices are climbing even higher, which jibes with a recent report from PwC. Canada and Australia are the only countries in the study where data caps are prevalent, yet Australia is an island where broadband capacity is limited by undersea cables while Canada is right next door to a good chunk of the entire world’s internet infrastructure.

In short, while we've made progress in stopping Big Telecom from forcing metered billing on all Canadians, we have a lot of work to do. More to come on this file, but for now you can make your voice heard with the CRTC through the tool we set up at Pricehike.ca

Article by Peter Nowak:

How badly are Canadian internet users getting spanked? It’s amazing they can sit, according to numbers from PricewaterhouseCoopers. Read more »

 

Large petition against TPP’s Internet trap hand-delivered to negotiations in San Diego

Broad coalition confronts TPP negotiations armed with over 90,000-strong StopTheTrap.net petition

July 7, 2012 – Organizations and people belonging to the StopTheTrap.net Coalition delivered 90,000+ signatures from around the world to Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiations Friday, arguing that the trade agreement’s Internet restriction provisions would create an “Internet trap”. The StopTheTrap.net Coalition represents a diverse range of organizations and people committed to standing against the TPP's extreme intellectual property restrictions.

Shortly after 12:00 PM PT Friday over one-thousand pages of petition signatures were delivered at the Hilton San Diego Bayfront Hotel, where TPP negotiations have been taking place since Monday. The handoff was backed by StopTheTrap.net Coalition members—including legal and policy experts and supporters from Public Knowledge, Public Citizen, SumOfUs, and the Electronic Frontier Foundation. Read more »

 

Infojustice: TPP negotiators are trying to shut you out

Groups from the StopTheTrap.net coalition are on the ground in San Diego as trade reps discuss the restrictive intellectual property aspects of the TPP—the Internet trap. But TPP negotiators aren't making it easy for us to bring your voices to the table. This is unacceptable. Decisions about whether you could be fined for your Internet use should not be made in ways that are secretive, extreme, and anti-democratic.

As the EFF puts in in their blog, "we have every right to be furious that government representatives are negotiating an agreement that will harm online expression, privacy, and innovation on the Internet." And we should be even more outraged that they're doing it all behind closed doors.

Get under negotiators' skin, and support the groups that are in San Diego right now, by adding your name at http://StopTheTrap.net/ and sharing it around. With your help, it won't be long until our voices get too loud to ignore.

Article by Mike Palmedo for infojustice.org:

The thirteenth round of negotiations of the TPP began on Monday morning, with stakeholder participation forums at the very beginning of the round. Efforts were made by USTR to accommodate stakeholder requests during a week where scheduling was complicated by a national holiday, but the outcome seemed rushed. Read more »

 

It’s time to amplify our voice against the TPP’s Internet Trap

This week, secretive negotiations are springing a trap for the Internet via the TPP, a new international trade agreement. Though negotiations are happening behind closed doors, we know some of what the big telecom and media lobbyists are up to.1 Now is the time to send a message that we will not let lobbyists criminalize our day-to-day use of the Internet through expensive fines.

We need to push the StopTheTrap.net campaign forward. Here’s why:

After failing to push through national laws to crush free expression and innovation online, big telecom and media lobbyists are taking the fight global. They’re trying to trap us in the past through an anti-Internet trade agreement called the TPP, an undemocratic, extreme attempt to take decisions about the Internet out of your hands.

But the pro-Internet community is taking the fight global as well—over 80,000 people like you around the world pushed back by signing the petition at StopTheTrap.net—and we’re about to deliver your signatures to your leaders. Read more »

 

Michael Geist: European Parliament Rejects ACTA - The Impossible Becomes Possible

Great news! The European Parliament has voted down ACTA. That's one secretive international treaty down...

This is a big victory in the international pro-Internet community, and it really shows that citizens like us do have the power to fight secretive trade agreements that threaten the open Interntet. We still have lots of work to do— starting with stopping the TPP's Internet trap — but let's take a moment to draw some inspiration from what has just happened with ACTA and use it when explaining the battles ahead (and our potential for huge success) to our friends, family, coworkers, and community.

Article by Michael Geist

On October 23, 2007, the U.S., E.U., Canada, and a handful of other countries announced plans to the negotiate the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement. The behind-the-scenes discussions had apparently been ongoing for several years, leading some countries to believe that a full agreement could be concluded within a year to coincide with the end of the Bush administration. Few paid much attention as the agreement itself was shrouded in secrecy. ACTA details slowly began to emerge, however, including revelations that lobby groups had been granted preferential access, the location of various meetings, and troubling details about the agreement itself. Read more »