OpenMedia

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Only hours until a crucial deadline on the future of the open Internet. Join us now.

Mon, 09/15/2014 - 10:41 -- Eva Prkachin

September 15th marks a crucial deadline for input to the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) about Big Telecom’s proposed Internet slowdown plan. And we need your help before the final cutoff for input tonight.

We’ve been working around the clock to keep up with the momentum that’s built for the open Internet, and need your help to keep going. If you haven’t already signed on to the global call for net neutrality, then please do so now. Or, if you’re already part of the campaign, then please spread the word via social media. Click our special share links below:

The New Yorker: Some times, you just gotta slow the Internet down

Fri, 09/12/2014 - 17:17 -- Eva Prkachin

The Internet Slowdown day made huge waves this week. Here's a great recap of what went down. Now, make sure to help us drive our campaign against the Internet slow lane home: go to https://BigTelecomVsTheWorld.org right now, sign on, and share widely.

Article by Vauhini Vara for the New Yorker

Visitors to Kickstarter are usually greeted with a Web page listing the projects that they can help to fund—a sous-vide immersion circulator connected to WiFi, a book of photos of Muhammad Ali. But, if you went to the site on Wednesday, you would have been presented instead with a full-screen message. “Stop Internet Slow Lanes,” it began. Under those words was an icon resembling the spinning wheel of death—that cursor on Mac computers that looks a bit like a stylized sun and turns around and around when something is taking a long time to load. Kickstarter, along with Netflix, Etsy, Tumblr, Reddit, and thousands of other sites, was engaged in an act of protest known as Internet Slowdown Day.

Honestly, this could be historic

Wed, 09/10/2014 - 14:17 -- Eva Prkachin

You just joined over 120,000 people from nearly 180 countries to join OpenMedia’s Big Telecom vs. the World action in just over one day. That’s amazing!

Now, the Internet is about to unleash a historic firestorm.

Today is the Internet Slowdown Day of Action, which may be the largest day of action for the open Internet the world has ever seen.

TechVibes: Internet Slowdown Day is taking off

Wed, 09/10/2014 - 13:53 -- Eva Prkachin

The spinning wheel of death is adorning hundreds of websites today to show netizens what will happen if Big Telecom is allowed to build Internet Slow Lanes. Have you spoken out yet in favour of #NetNeutrality? Don't miss your chance: http://StopTheSlowdown.net?src=fba

Article by TechVibes

Canadian digital rights group OpenMedia.ca has joined Netflix, reddit, Vimeo, and a huge international coalition to support Internet Slowdown Day today.

A call out to Internet users, websites, artists, organizations and everyone else to join the day of action and stop the Internet slowdown

Tue, 09/09/2014 - 15:40 -- Steve Anderson

As you may have heard, Big Telecom conglomerates want to slow down your Internet and make online services more expensive. But so far, "Net Neutrality" rules in several countries have banned their interference.The U.S., Canada, Chile, Colombia, Brazil, and the Netherlands are among those countries that have passed rules to prevent telecom giants from selectively slowing down web services or making them more expensive.

Tech Crunch: Practically no-one wants Internet slow lanes

Thu, 09/04/2014 - 16:46 -- Eva Prkachin

Internet users are overwhelmingly against allowing Big Telecom to create slow lanes online. Get ready for a huge battle to save net neutrality, and stay tuned to this page to find out what's going on.

Article by Alex Wilhelm for Tech Crunch

A newly released study executed by the Sunlight Foundation of hundreds of thousands of comments submitted to the FCC by the public found that the vast majority spoke in favor of net neutrality. The group estimates that “less than 1 percent of comments were clearly opposed to net neutrality.”

Democracy Now: A preview of the Internet slow lane is coming soon

Thu, 09/04/2014 - 14:47 -- Eva Prkachin

Have you wondered what the Internet might be like if Big Cable is allowed to force traffic into slow lanes? Amy Goodman spells it out, and it ain't pretty. Speak out now at https://OpenMedia.org/SlowLane

Article by Amy Goodman with Denis Moynihan for Democracy Now

Next Wednesday, Sept. 10, if your favorite website seems to load slowly, take a closer look: You might be experiencing the Battle for the Net’s “Internet Slowdown,” a global day of grassroots action. Protesters won’t actually slow the Internet down, but will place on their websites animated “Loading” graphics (which organizers call “the proverbial ‘spinning wheel of death’”) to symbolize what the Internet might soon look like. As that wheel spins, the rules about how the internet works are being redrawn. Large Internet service providers, or ISPs, like Comcast, Time Warner, AT&T and Verizon are trying to change the rules that govern your online life.

Hub Communications: Australia to FCC regulators: don't break the Internet

Thu, 09/04/2014 - 14:09 -- Eva Prkachin

Australia's Internet could change for the worse if the FCC quashes Net Neutrality.

Article by Glen Neil for Hub Communications

Here at HCD we aim to keep our clients well informed on all subjects that relate to the digital space. The Net Neutrality debate may not be the sexiest topic on our radar, but as it has the potential to change the way we use the Internet, we thought it was worth passing on the following information...

The Inquirer: The global Internet will suffer if net neutrality falls

Thu, 09/04/2014 - 13:49 -- Eva Prkachin

Think that the Internet slow lane will only affect Internet users in America? Think again.

Article by Chris Merriman for the Inquirer

Last Thursday the US Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted by a three to two margin to move forward with chairman Tom Wheeler's proposals to gut net neutrality rules in the USA. But what exactly does that mean? And why should we, on a small island 3,000 miles away, care anyway?

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