OpenMedia

Stop the Secrecy

Freedom of Expression

Ars Technica: Verizon's Internet slow lane gamble is backfiring

Fri, 02/06/2015 - 16:32 -- Eva Prkachin

U mad bro?

Article by Jon Brodkin for Ars Technica

The Federal Communications Commission is about to make a big decision that wouldn't have been necessary if not for a lawsuit "won" by Verizon.

Verizon sued to block the FCC's 2010 net neutrality order,leading to a court ruling that threw out rules against blocking and discrimination. The court said the FCC erred by imposing per se common carrier rules—the kind of rules applied to the old telephone network—onto broadband without first classifying broadband providers as common carriers. Now, FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler is proposing to reclassify broadband as a common carriage service, an even worse outcome for Verizon and fellow ISPs.

Huffington Post: FCC Chairman makes a huge promise

Thu, 02/05/2015 - 16:02 -- Eva Prkachin

Internet slow lane battles are raging around the world. From the U.S. to the EU to Argentina to Turkey, regulators are considering strong net neutrality rules right now. Here's a peek at how rules compare between neighbours like Canada and the U.S.

Article by Josh Tabish for The Huffington Post

Yesterday, U.S. FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler announced his agency's commitment to the strongest possible rules to prevent telecommunications companies from forcing certain websites and services into a slow lane online.

OpenMedia is crowdsourcing a Jumbotron at the FCC for the final Net Neutrality push

Thu, 02/05/2015 - 14:13 -- Eva Prkachin

FCC Chair Tom Wheeler has just revealed key details about upcoming rules to stop Big Telecom’s Internet slow lane plan.

Decision-makers are on the right path but we know telecom lobbyists are pulling out all the stops to stuff the rules full of loopholes before the FCC’s final vote on February 26. They are even threatening to sue the FCC.

To push back, your OpenMedia team is crowdsourcing resources to park a JUMBOTRON in front of the FCC to make the voices of concerned Internet users like you heard. Do you wanna be part of this?

TechCrunch: If it's data, it could be in trouble

Fri, 01/30/2015 - 14:33 -- Eva Prkachin

Could your text messages get tossed in the slow lane if net neutrality falls?

Article by Nic Denholm for BGR

Net neutrality was one of last year’s biggest tech stories. The one that went mainstream after John Oliver poked fun at it and beseeched his viewers to flood the FCC’s comments page with tirades against a two-tiered Internet (which caused the site to crash).

EFF: We're fighting back against the TPP and we need your help

Mon, 01/26/2015 - 13:56 -- Eva Prkachin

Couldn't make it to today's protest in New York against the TPP? Find out what else you can do to fight Internet censorship.

Article by Maira Sutton for EFF

The next round of secret Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) negotiations begins this Monday, January 26, and runs through the following week at the Sheraton New York Time Square Hotel in downtown Manhattan. As with many previous TPP meetings, the public will be shut out of talks as negotiators convene behind closed doors to decide binding rules that could impact how our lawmakers set digital policy in the decades to come. Big content industry interests have been given privileged access to negotiating texts and have driven the US Trade Representative's mandate when it comes to copyright—which is why the TPP carries extreme copyright measures that ignore users' rights.

Time: The John Oliver effect: it's officially real

Fri, 01/23/2015 - 16:13 -- Eva Prkachin

After drumming up a huge amount of support to stop the Internet slow lane, find out how else the John Oliver effect is creating change.

Article by Victor Luckerson for Time

His show has crashed websites, boosted donations and inspired legislation

Comedians mock our cultural and political institutions on TV all the time. But it’s not every day that a comic’s jokes crash a government website or directly inspire legislators to push for new laws.

Medium: This is how you create change

Fri, 01/23/2015 - 12:43 -- Eva Prkachin

Why the sudden turn-around on the Internet slow lane debate in the U.S.? It's simple: Internet users spoke out.

Article by Susan Crawford for Medium

Five years ago, when the Obama administration was still wet behind the ears and hugely popular, the Obama Federal Communications Commission (FCC) released a National Broadband Plan that talked a lot about the magic of spectrum but said almost nothing about competition policy. In particular, the plan did not recommend that the FCC use its authority under the 1996 Telecommunications Act to act like a regulator when dealing with the providers of high-speed Internet access. Nor did the plan mention net neutrality. The idea was, apparently, that focusing on net neutrality — then seen as a polarizing, touchy subject — would doom the success of the plan, which got a big roll-out, a major media push and a splashy new Web site.

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