OpenMedia

Stop the Secrecy

Freedom of Expression

EFF: Canadian Court to the Entire World: No Links For You!

Thu, 06/26/2014 - 13:24 -- Eva Prkachin

Has the B.C. Supreme Court lost its mind?

Article by Maira Sutton for EFF

The Supreme Court of British Columbia has ordered Google to remove entire domains from its search results—a decision that could have enormous global implications on free expression. This is the latest of several instances of courts exercising dangerous jurisdictional overreach, where they have applied local laws to remove content on the Internet. Not only did the Court order Google to delete the site from its search results on the Canadian “Google.ca” domain, it went even further by demanding it censor the domain worldwide by deleting every instance of the site from its global index.

Tech Times: U.S. mayors urge FCC to maintain net neutrality, no to fast lanes

Thu, 06/26/2014 - 12:35 -- Eva Prkachin

Could this be the future of locally-owned Internet services?

Article by Nicole Arce for Tech Times

U.S. mayors led by San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee adopted a resolution in support of net neutrality and called on White House and Congress to urge the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to exercise its power in preventing Internet service providers from giving preferential treatment to affluent websites.

The Verge: Supreme Court rules software patents that cover 'abstract ideas' are invalid

Fri, 06/20/2014 - 15:56 -- Eva Prkachin

The patent trolls take another hit.

Article by Adi Robertson for The Verge

Software patents aren't dead, but they just took a blow. In a unanimous decision, the Supreme Court has ruled that a series of banking patents didn't cover a concrete software process but an abstract idea, throwing them out and potentially setting a stricter precedent for future patents.

Huffington Post: The U.S. Government Is Investigating Why Your Netflix Is So Slow

Fri, 06/20/2014 - 14:59 -- Eva Prkachin

It turns out the U.S. FCC gets just as annoyed as you do when poor streaming quality thwarts your binge watching the new Orange is the New Black season. But will they do something about it?

Article by Gerry Smith for The Huffington Post

If your "Orange is the New Black" binge marathon has been interrupted by buffering and you wondered who to blame, the Federal Communications Commission is now trying to answer your question.

Washington Post: Democrats unveil legislation forcing the FCC to ban Internet fast lanes

Thu, 06/19/2014 - 15:07 -- Eva Prkachin

The fight against Internet Slow Lanes is heating up in the U.S. Do you think the FCC will do the right thing?

Article by Brian Fung for The Washington Post

Democratic lawmakers will unveil a piece of bicameral legislation Tuesday that would force the Federal Communications Commission to ban fast lanes on the Internet.

Video: OpenMedia represents citizen voices in a live Google Hangout on the FCC’s Internet Slow Lane plan

Mon, 06/16/2014 - 11:20 -- Josh Tabish

Last week, we let you know that our own Campaigns Coordinator, Josh Tabish, would be appearing in a Live Google Hangout organized by Net2 Northern Michigan, to talk about the FCC’s proposed rules to establish slow lanes on the Internet, alongside panelists from other Net2 chapters around North America.

Huffington Post: Reddit Co-Founder: Call The Government And Defend Net Neutrality

Fri, 06/13/2014 - 16:26 -- Eva Prkachin

Want to push the battle against Internet slow lanes forward? Reddit Co-founder Alexis Ohanian explains how.

Article by Emily Tess Katz for The Huffington Post

People have been ranting about net neutrality on Reddit for years. Now, the co-founder of the "front page of the Internet" wants Redditors to take their complaints one step further by calling the Federal Communications Commission itself.

Ars Technica: Payback time: First patent troll ordered to pay “extraordinary case” fees

Fri, 06/13/2014 - 14:58 -- Eva Prkachin

On a dark, misty night, this California startup met with a nasty patent troll. "You violated my patent!" said the troll, "now pay up!" Here's what happened next.

Article by Joe Mullin for Ars Technica

When Santa Barbara startup FindTheBest (FTB) was sued by a patent troll called Lumen View last year, it vowed to fight back rather than pay up the $50,000 licensing fee Lumen was asking for. Company CEO Kevin O'Connor made it personal, pledging $1 million of his own money to fight the legal battle.

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