OpenMedia

Stop the Secrecy

Innovation

Defend the Internet: Join the DAT

Wed, 11/26/2014 - 09:53 -- Eva Prkachin

At OpenMedia, we believe in the possibilities of the open Internet. We're working to safeguard the possibility to easily create ties and connections with people all over the world.

The challenge, however, is when those ties remain weak -- when we only know each other very loosely, not enough to collaborate on big projects together, or build relationships over time.

Ars Technica: How cities can lead growth in Internet infrastructure

Thu, 11/20/2014 - 11:25 -- Eva Prkachin

U.S. cities are getting tired of Big Telecom's price gouging and slow connections, so they're taking matters into their own hands.

Article by Jon Brodkin for Ars Technica

State and local governments aren't typically known for leading the way on technology. Remember that West Virginia library that uses a $20,000 router for a building the size of a trailer?

Washington Post: 7 Colorado communities to Big Telecom: It's cool, we got this

Fri, 11/07/2014 - 16:38 -- Eva Prkachin

Big Telecom have been doing their darndest to prevent communities from building their own super high-speed Internet services, but you just can't stop grassroots Internet users.

Article by Nancy Scola for the Washington Post

Voters in seven cities and counties in Colorado voted Tuesday to free their local governments to offer Internet service.

Is the FCC about to betray 5+ million people?

Wed, 11/05/2014 - 16:24 -- Josh Tabish

We’ve just learned that U.S. FCC Chair Tom Wheeler is considering a plan that could fall far short of what 5+ million of you have spoken out for: strong, enforceable rules that ban slow lanes on the Internet.1

With an official plan coming from the FCC as early as November 20th, we must act fast to prepare our next steps. We’ve got a rapid-response campaign in the works, but we will need help to make it as loud as possible.

What happens in the U.S. will be seen as an example for other countries worldwide. It’s crucial that we win this fight--if not, Internet slow lanes could quickly expand across the globe.

The Verge: Check out "Off the Grid"

Thu, 10/30/2014 - 14:32 -- Eva Prkachin

This video game uses intuitive learning to teach players about how online information really functions on the Internet - from enhancing our understanding to undermining our privacy.

Article by Andrew Webster for the Verge

In 2011, Rich Metson was a metal worker who was just starting to dabble in the world of coding and open source software. This newfound interest led him to a conference put on by the Internet Society, and in between dry discussions of internet protocols and domain names, he stumbled on a talk by Columbia University professor Eben Moglen. That moment was the first time Metson truly understood the implications of net neutrality and data privacy. He describes the talk as "a rallying cry." And coupled with ongoing events like the Arab Spring uprising, it had a profound influence on him.

Critical Thought: Net Neutrality will save the Internet

Thu, 10/30/2014 - 08:23 -- Eva Prkachin

Big Telecom wants to build an Internet slow lane to squeeze more money out of Internet users. That's bad enough. But there's a much more troubling consequence of restricting Internet traffic, and it threatens to undermine the free flow of knowledge and information that makes the Internet great.

Article by Bob Castleman for Critical Thought

Net Neutrality is often argued in terms of tiered services, equal access, bandwidth throttling, innovation by start ups and other issues related to the mechanics and economics of the Internet. But beneath this raucous fray lies a more dangerous and less talked about issue - that being the control of information in general. How is it that we receive our information and how is it that we decide its value? Through how many filters has the “real story” been passed before it arrives on our devices? What is the difference between The Arab Spring and The Great Firewall of China if not free versus restricted flow of information?

BGR: Cord-cutting is reshaping the cable industry

Fri, 10/24/2014 - 14:15 -- Eva Prkachin

Will giant cable companies ever catch up with cord-cutting?

Article by Brad Reed for BGR

Big providers like Comcast and Time Warner Cable may want to cling to the past but it looks like smaller cable providers seem to know that cord cutting is actually the future. The Wall Street Journal reports that smaller cable providers are increasingly placing more emphasis on their broadband offerings and less on TV packages as consumers have shown that they would much rather have a faster Internet service than hundreds of channels they never watch.

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