OpenMedia

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Motherboard: These towns and cities are taking the Internet into their own hands

Thu, 10/23/2014 - 15:25 -- Eva Prkachin

What do you do when Big Telecom keeps skipping your city over for crucial infrastructure upgrades?

Article by Jason Koebler for Motherboard

More than two dozen cities in 19 states announced today that they're sick of big telecom skipping them over for internet infrastructure upgrades and would like to build gigabit fiber networks themselves and help other cities follow their lead.

We’re taking your voice straight to an FCC Commissioner who could stop the Internet slow lane

Thu, 10/16/2014 - 15:49 -- Josh Tabish

We just found out we have a rare and unique opportunity to take your voice straight to decision-makers who have the power to stop Big Telecom’s Internet slow lane plan.

Our Founder and Executive Director, Steve Anderson, will be holding a one-on-one meeting with FCC Commissioner Mignon Clyburn at an international conference taking place in Ottawa next week. And want to know what you would like us to say to her.

“Cobweb Chains” or Creative Commons: Who do copyright laws really protect?

Wed, 10/15/2014 - 16:58 -- Eva Prkachin

by Reilly Yeo

A lot can happen in 14 years. In that amount of time, we go from kindergarten to college age. We’ve lived just over 14 years since the turn of this millennia, and the Y2K scare probably feels like a distant memory.

Information wants to be free – so it makes sense that when the first monopoly rights to information and knowledge were granted by the 1710 Statute of Anne (the world’s first copyright law) they lasted for a reasonable 14 years. When the booksellers and publishers -- the Big Media entities of the day -- tried to extend their exclusive rights beyond 14 years, the English House of Lords firmly rejected them.

Engadget: Obama speaks out against tiered Internet service

Fri, 10/10/2014 - 16:21 -- Eva Prkachin

Don't let anyone tell you speaking out online doesn't work. Hundreds of thousands of people took a stand against the Internet slow lane. We sent our own Josh Tabish to the White House. Now, look who's talking about creating strong net neutrality laws.

Article by Terrence O'Brien for Engadget

President Obama found a place in the heart of many techies during his first campaign thanks to his staunch support of net neutrality. Six years later the debate still rages on, but Obama's position hasn't changed. During a Q&A in California on Thursday the President reiterated his support for the principle saying:

Together, we made President Obama speak out on the Internet slow lane

Fri, 10/10/2014 - 12:18 -- Eva Prkachin

It looks like we did it. After our meeting with senior White House officials two weeks ago, U.S. President Barack Obama has spoken out against Big Telecom’s Internet slow lane plan, and voiced support for the open Internet and real net neutrality.

This is a crucial development in the fight to safeguard the open Internet. Obama has the power to stop the slow lane plane, and we need to ensure he doesn't buckle under pressure from Big Telecom lobbyists.

ProPublica: There's something fishy about these blue mystery boxes

Thu, 10/09/2014 - 14:56 -- Eva Prkachin

What's up with these mysterious "Internet suggestion" boxes that are popping up in major U.S. cities?

Article by Robert Faturechi for ProPublica

On a recent Monday evening, two bearded young men in skinny jeans came to a parklet in San Francisco's trendy Hayes Valley neighborhood and mounted what looked like an art installation. It was a bright blue, oversized "suggestion box" for the Internet.

Here’s what happened when I went to the White House

Mon, 09/29/2014 - 14:29 -- Josh Tabish

When we heard we had been invited to meet with senior White House decision-makers about the future of the open Internet, we dropped everything to arrange flights, hotels, and everything else you need to deliver the voices of everyday Internet users to some of the most powerful decision-makers in the world.

We also announced the big news to our community as quickly as possible, and saw an outpouring of support that astounded us, and made our trip possible. Now, 4500 miles, four plane rides, and dozens of cups of coffee later, we have the pictures to prove that we took your voice straight to D.C.![1]

Ars Technica: Two FCC commissioners just changed the whole game

Fri, 09/26/2014 - 15:04 -- Eva Prkachin

You spoke out in record numbers to stop Big Telecom's slow lane plan. Now, that pressure is having a powerful effect, as FCC commissioners move to ban slow lanes and enshrine wireless net neutrality. Good job! Now read on.

Article by Jon Brodkin for Ars Technica

FCC commissioners Jessica Rosenworcel and Mignon Clyburn yesterday called for stronger network neutrality rules than the ones fellow Democrat and Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler has thus far supported.

Ars Technica: AT&T + Verizon: Stop trying to make data caps happen

Thu, 09/25/2014 - 11:13 -- Eva Prkachin

AT&T and Verizon are hopping in the wayback machine on their definition of "broadband"

Article by Jon Brodkin for Ars Technica

AT&T and Verizon have been fighting to preserve 4Mbps as the nation’s definition of “broadband,” saying the Federal Communications Commission should abandon plans to raise the minimum to 10Mbps.

OpenMedia takes your voices to the FCC in Sacramento

Wed, 09/24/2014 - 14:45 -- Eva Prkachin

OpenMedia partnered with Big Telecom -vs- The World allies at RootsAction, Credo, and DailyKos today to deliver over 400,000 petition signatures and comments against the Internet slow lane to decision-makers. This would never have happened without our community’s relentless pressure and generous support.

The petition delivery took place in Sacramento, California, at an official forum organized by Congresswoman Doris Matsui, known for her outspoken defense of Net Neutrality. Rep. Matsui’s forum was attended by FCC Commissioners Mignon Clyburn and Jessica Rosenworcel.

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