OpenMedia

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Save the Internet, Save the World: The Defining Battle for Net Neutrality

Thu, 08/28/2014 - 15:52 -- Eva Prkachin

Guest blog by OpenMedia community member Cynthia Khoo

The world needs a hero, and that hero is you.

Our worldwide web is currently dangling above an alligator-filled moat, tied to the train tracks, strapped to a live bomb (tick-tock), and rapidly headed towards gory destruction at the end of a Comcast/Bell/ [insert-your-country's-biggest-telco-name-here]-branded conveyor belt. Time of death: 12:00am. Cause of death: Big Telecom, aggressive lobbying, money and power imbalances, and a misguided FCC net neutrality decision that ignores over 1.1 million comments and counting from everyday Internet users like you.

What does your lazy summer afternoon at the lake have to do with saving the open Internet?

Wed, 08/27/2014 - 14:48 -- Eva Prkachin

Hi! I'm Alexa, OpenMedia's new Managing Director - great to meet you! I took a break from the behind the scenes work to share why I’m here. Summer days are perfect for chilling out, reconnecting with friends and family, and reflecting on what in our lives matters most. What matters to me is that my work contributes to building a more just and collaborative world for my kids. I care deeply about OpenMedia’s work to safeguard the possibilities of the open Internet. It’s an essential tool that creates transformative change. This is reason #1 for accepting my job at OpenMedia.

It’s one thing to say one cares about democracy and collaboration. It’s another thing to put these values into practice. I saw in OpenMedia an organization consciously and deliberately putting their values of participatory democracy and transparency into practice. This is why we use our Community Survey to shape our future work and also why we ask, “why are you inspired by the possibilities of an open Internet?”

Motherboard: Big data vs an enigmatic medieval discovery

Fri, 08/22/2014 - 15:16 -- Eva Prkachin

See how the Internet is helping to solve this decades-long medieval text mystery

Article by Felipe Maia for Motherboard

The Voynich Manuscript might have been dropped to Earth by aliens; it might be a medieval cipher whose mystery outlived anyone who had the key; it also might be a prank and moneymaking scheme by some haggard rare bookseller. But whatever the book actually is, Brazilian scientists are pretty certain that the manuscript's text—which is written in a language and alphabet only found in the Voynich itself—isn't just gibberish. There's meaning in there, and complex network modeling or other big data tools might crack the enigma that has thus far proven unbreakable.

Wired: Don't let cable companies destroy everything great about the Internet

Wed, 08/20/2014 - 14:46 -- Eva Prkachin

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings has a few words to say about how Internet slow lanes could harm the future of the Internet. If you're as worried as we are, speak up now at https://OpenMedia.org/SlowLane

Article by Reed Hastings for Wired

The Internet has already changed how we live and work, and we're only just getting started. Who'd have thought even five years ago that people would be streaming Ultra HD 4K video over their home Internet connections?

DSLReports.com: Infographic - the Internet speaks up for Net Neutrality

Tue, 08/19/2014 - 13:55 -- Eva Prkachin

Check out this amazing visualization of all 1.1 million comments made to the FCC about Internet Slow Lanes.

Article by Karl Bode for DSLReports.com

As noted recently, the FCC decided to dump all of the comments they received on net neutrality out in the open in the form of six XML files, allowing analysis of what people and companies were thinking on the issue. Initial dissection of that data was largely superficial, with stories exploring things like the fact that people sure like to say the f-bomb a lot.

Reuters: Wondered why your "unlimited" data plan was so slow?

Fri, 08/15/2014 - 15:18 -- Eva Prkachin

Apparently "unlimited" data means something completely different to Big Telecom than it does to their customers

Article by Alina Selyukh and Marina Lopes for Reuters

The top U.S. communications regulator on Friday said he is asking all large U.S. wireless carriers to explain how they decide when to slow download speeds for some customers, after questioning Verizon Wireless about such a plan.

New York Times: President Obama: No Internet Fast Lanes

Fri, 08/15/2014 - 14:54 -- Eva Prkachin

New York Times Editorial: President Obama, say no to Internet Slow Lanes

Article by the editorial board for the New York Times

The Federal Communications Commission, which could soon allow phone and cable companies to block or interfere with Internet content, has been deluged with more than a million comments. Last week, President Obama offered some thoughts of his own by saying that the Internet should be left open “so that the next Google or the next Facebook can succeed.”

TechCrunch: Obama comes out against the Internet slow lane

Mon, 08/11/2014 - 16:23 -- Eva Prkachin

"You want to leave it open so the next Google and the next Facebook can succeed." Strong words against the Internet slow lane from U.S. President Barack Obama. Show your support for Net Neutrality at https://OpenMedia.org/SlowLane

Article by Alex Wilhelm for TechCrunch

President Barack Obama spoke in favor of net neutrality this week, pushing back against the idea of paid prioritization, which many call Internet “fast lanes.” Following the president’s comments, a number of technology companies joined cultural and privacy groups in praising the American leader.

Ars Technica: 6 ways Congress failed to lead on digital issues this year

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 13:40 -- Eva Prkachin

By any standard, this hasn't been a good year for getting desperately needed legal reforms passed around privacy, patent trolling, and digital innovation in the U.S. How do you think American politicians could do better?

Article by Joe Mullin for Ars Technica

August isn’t the top time of year for thinking about tech policy. For many, it’s vacation time, a month when Americans are more focused on hacking a path to the nearest beach than hacking their computers.

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