OpenMedia

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Bloomberg: Is Title II is coming to an Internet near you?

Wed, 01/07/2015 - 15:50 -- Eva Prkachin

FCC Chairman and former Telecom lobbyist Tom Wheeler announced today that upcoming open Internet rules will put an end to Big Telecom's Internet slow lane plan. Let's hope he means it – we'll be watching closely

Article by Lucas Shaw and Todd Shields for Bloomberg

The Federal Communications Commission’s proposal for open-Internet rules will align with a blueprint President Barack Obama offered last month for strong regulation to guarantee Web traffic is treated equally, the head of the agency said.

Daily Dot: Just as predicted: state spying leads to censorship

Mon, 01/05/2015 - 15:05 -- Eva Prkachin

Journalists in democracies are self-censoring more and more thanks to mass surveillance

Article by Dell Cameron for The Daily Dot

An alarming study published Monday by one of America's top literary organizations reveals that the percentage of writers living in democratic countries who may be censoring themselves due to government surveillance is approaching levels reported by writers living under authoritarian regimes.

Washington Post: Speaking out of both sides of their mouths

Thu, 12/18/2014 - 16:25 -- Eva Prkachin

Big Telecom can't get their story straight on the Internet slow lane

Article by Brian Fung for the Washington Post

In the past week, I've written a bit about how broadband industry execs are telling Washington one thing about strict net neutrality while suggesting something else to Wall Street. The companies are telling investors that they'll keep making their networks better, just like always — even if federal regulators adopt aggressive Internet rules. But that's not what regulators are hearing from the companies, who are telling them that those same rules would depress investment in the network and hurt consumers.

The Knight Foundation: Here's the whole Internet slow lane debate distilled

Wed, 12/17/2014 - 16:51 -- Eva Prkachin

Are you looking for some talking points to explain Net Neutrality to your family over the holiday table? Check out this invaluable resource.

Article by the Knight Foundation

The debate over regulation of the Internet may be one of the most important of our day. Companies that have invested billions in Internet infrastructure contend that they need the ability to manage their networks, prioritizing some content over others to maintain service, and charging for higher speeds.

Advocates of net neutrality see the Internet as a utility, essential for individual learning, working, civic participation and free expression, as well as economic competition and innovation – too important to have fast lanes and slow lanes, with the fastest speeds going to the highest bidder.

The Internet is at a turning point and here’s some good news

Tue, 12/16/2014 - 14:59 -- Chris Malmo

Hi there, I’m Chris Malmo, a grassroots development coordinator at OpenMedia, and it’s my job to help our community interact and communicate with our team.

It’s been a big year for your OpenMedia team, but I’d like to step back and think about what it all means and the movement we’re a part of.

As the first generation to come online, we have a responsibility to leave the best possible Internet for future people with dreams just like ours.

Washington Post: Will changes in the U.S. ruin your Internet?

Mon, 12/15/2014 - 16:40 -- Eva Prkachin

If the U.S. allows Big Telecom to build an Internet slow lane, how will the rest of the world be affected?

Article by Nancy Scola for The Washington Post

Two human rights professors at the George Washington University Law School have come up with that rarest of unicorns in the debate over net neutrality: a novel argument.

The Guardian: There's no excuse for mass spying

Fri, 12/12/2014 - 15:07 -- Eva Prkachin

Has the indiscriminate mass collection of private information really made the world any safer?

Article by Owen Bowcott for The Guardian

The “secret, massive and indiscriminate” surveillance conducted by intelligence services and disclosed by the former US intelligence contractor Edward Snowdencannot be justified by the fight against terrorism, the most senior human rights official in Europe has warned.

BGR: Big Telecom is trying to scare you

Thu, 12/11/2014 - 14:29 -- Eva Prkachin

Halloween's over, guys.

Article by Brad Reed for BGR

With a renewed push to reclassify ISPs as common carriers under Title II of the Telecommunications Act, the cable industry has ramped up its public relations blitz to convince you that Title II reclassification is the single scariest proposal in the history of the world. Ars Technica’s Jon Brodkin points us to a new ad funded by the National Cable and Telecommunications Association that is just about the least convincing argument against Title II reclassification that we can imagine.

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