OpenMedia

Stop the Secrecy

Privacy

The Guardian: Is mass spying undermining your well-being?

Tue, 12/09/2014 - 13:30 -- Eva Prkachin

"Indiscriminate intelligence-gathering presents a grave risk to our mental health, productivity, social cohesion, and ultimately our future."

Article by Chris Chambers for The Guardian

Recent disclosures about the scope of government surveillance are staggering. We now know that the UK's Tempora program records huge volumes of private communications, including – as standard – our emails, social networking activity, internet histories, and telephone calls. Much of this data is then shared with the US National Security Agency, which operates its own (formerly) clandestine surveillance operation. Similar programs are believed to operate in Russia, China, India, and throughout several European countries.

The Guardian: What secrets are you revealing every day?

Mon, 12/08/2014 - 14:53 -- Eva Prkachin

Big data is getting creepier and creepier.

Article by Ben Goldacre

It’s easy to be worried about people simply spying on your confidential data. iCloud and Google+ have your intimate photos; Transport for London knows where your travelcard has been; Yahoo holds every email you’ve ever written. We trust these people to respect our privacy, and to be secure. Often they fail: celebrity photos are stolen; emails are shared with spies; the confessional app Whisper is caught tracking the location of users.

Medium: Facebook thinks you're some kind of terrifying ghost-blob

Fri, 12/05/2014 - 12:30 -- Eva Prkachin

Ever wondered what you look like to a face-recognition algorithm? Spoiler alert: incredibly creepy.

Article by Kyle Chayka for Medium

Sterling Crispin’s “Data Masks” are haunting portraits that don’t actually depict any one person. Instead, they use raw data to show how technology perceives humanity. Reverse-engineered from surveillance face-recognition algorithms and then fed through Facebook’s face-detection software, the Data Masks “confront viewers with the realization that they’re being seen and watched basically all the time,” Crispin says.

Ars Technica: More complaining from the FBI over cell phone encryption

Wed, 12/03/2014 - 13:22 -- Eva Prkachin

The FBI is really having a tough time getting over this whole encrypted phone thing.

Article by Cyrus Farivar for Ars Technica

Newly discovered court documents from two federal criminal cases in New York and California that remain otherwise sealed suggest that the Department of Justice (DOJ) is pursuing an unusual legal strategy to compel cellphone makers to assist investigations.

A new tool to fight Big Telecom's slowdown of your favorite online services

Mon, 12/01/2014 - 16:33 -- David Christopher

The battle against Big Telecom’s Internet Slow Lane plan is really heating up - and it’s never been more important to speak out. Decision-makers are on the verge of making new rules that will either open the door to Internet slow lanes, or preserve the free and open Internet for future generations.

Use our straightforward Letter to the Editor tool right now to make sure your voice is heard at this crucial time ->>

A lot is at stake. If the telecom giants get their way, the Internet as we know it would change forever: Big Telecom giants like Comcast and Verizon are pushing for new rules that would make your Internet more expensive, while slowing every website that can’t pay expensive new prioritisation fees to a crawl.

TechCrunch: What cell phones have to teach us about Net Neutrality

Mon, 12/01/2014 - 14:23 -- Eva Prkachin

Wondering what the world might look like if Big Telecom builds Internet slow lanes? Look no further than the recent history of SMS

Article by Jeff Lawson

People have wondered how an Internet without net neutrality would work. Net neutrality is more than just a debate, it’s not a hypothetical, and it’s real and alive today with SMS.

The Verge: Guy who profited off of net neutrality wants to destroy it

Fri, 11/28/2014 - 15:30 -- Eva Prkachin

Apparently, already being a billionaire isn't enough

Article by Ben Popper for The Verge

Over the last few weeks, billionaire and former tech executive Mark Cuban has become increasingly vocal on the subject of net neutrality. In an interview with The Washington Post yesterday, Cuban said that he was in favor of creating "fast lanes" on the internet that would ensure the quality of certain services. He’s a man who has always had plenty of opinions, and he’s certainly entitled to them, but in this case, it’s worth pointing out what a hypocrite he sounds like, pushing a position that would have been a death blow to the very startup that made him so rich in the first place.

BoingBoing: Governments should focus on cybersecurity, not spying

Fri, 11/28/2014 - 15:30 -- Eva Prkachin

Government spying is putting our cybersecurity at risk

Article by Cory Doctorow for BoingBoing

Citizenlab's Ron Diebert lays out the terrible contradiction of putting spy agencies -- who rely on vulnerabilities in the networks used by their adversaries -- in change of cybersecurity, which is securing those same networks for their own citizens.

The Intercept: U.S.-built surveillance tools found in Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan

Thu, 11/27/2014 - 14:16 -- Eva Prkachin

Have U.S. firms been complicit in oppressive regimes in Central Asia?

- Article by Cora Currier for The Intercept

U.S. and Israeli companies have been selling surveillance systems to Central Asian countries with records of political repression and human rights abuse, according to a new report by Privacy International. The U.K.-based watchdog charges that the American firms Verint and Netronome enable surveillance in Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan.

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