OpenMedia

Stop the Secrecy

Privacy

Ars Technica: Verizon's Internet slow lane gamble is backfiring

Fri, 02/06/2015 - 16:32 -- Eva Prkachin

U mad bro?

Article by Jon Brodkin for Ars Technica

The Federal Communications Commission is about to make a big decision that wouldn't have been necessary if not for a lawsuit "won" by Verizon.

Verizon sued to block the FCC's 2010 net neutrality order,leading to a court ruling that threw out rules against blocking and discrimination. The court said the FCC erred by imposing per se common carrier rules—the kind of rules applied to the old telephone network—onto broadband without first classifying broadband providers as common carriers. Now, FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler is proposing to reclassify broadband as a common carriage service, an even worse outcome for Verizon and fellow ISPs.

Huffington Post: FCC Chairman makes a huge promise

Thu, 02/05/2015 - 16:02 -- Eva Prkachin

Internet slow lane battles are raging around the world. From the U.S. to the EU to Argentina to Turkey, regulators are considering strong net neutrality rules right now. Here's a peek at how rules compare between neighbours like Canada and the U.S.

Article by Josh Tabish for The Huffington Post

Yesterday, U.S. FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler announced his agency's commitment to the strongest possible rules to prevent telecommunications companies from forcing certain websites and services into a slow lane online.

OpenMedia is crowdsourcing a Jumbotron at the FCC for the final Net Neutrality push

Thu, 02/05/2015 - 14:13 -- Eva Prkachin

FCC Chair Tom Wheeler has just revealed key details about upcoming rules to stop Big Telecom’s Internet slow lane plan.

Decision-makers are on the right path but we know telecom lobbyists are pulling out all the stops to stuff the rules full of loopholes before the FCC’s final vote on February 26. They are even threatening to sue the FCC.

To push back, your OpenMedia team is crowdsourcing resources to park a JUMBOTRON in front of the FCC to make the voices of concerned Internet users like you heard. Do you wanna be part of this?

RT: Is mass online surveillance making us less safe?

Tue, 02/03/2015 - 16:22 -- Eva Prkachin

The NSA and other spying agencies use security to justify bulk surveillance, but what if it's increasing the threat?

Article by RT

National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden answered questions from Canadian students on Monday, telling them that mass surveillance can actually harm the ability to prevent terrorist attacks while also being detrimental to personal privacy.

The New Yorker: More than a year on from the Snowden revelations, what's changed?

Fri, 01/30/2015 - 15:45 -- Eva Prkachin

What will it take to stop mass spying?

Article by Mattathias Schwartz for The New Yorker

President Obama spent only a few moments of his State of the Union this week talking about the National Security Agency and civil liberties. A year before, he’d promised to “end” Section 215, the N.S.A.’s most controversial surveillance program, “as it currently exists.” In his speech last Tuesday, he said almost nothing concrete, aside from mentioning a forthcoming report “on how we’re keeping our promise to keep our country safe while strengthening privacy.”

TechCrunch: If it's data, it could be in trouble

Fri, 01/30/2015 - 14:33 -- Eva Prkachin

Could your text messages get tossed in the slow lane if net neutrality falls?

Article by Nic Denholm for BGR

Net neutrality was one of last year’s biggest tech stories. The one that went mainstream after John Oliver poked fun at it and beseeched his viewers to flood the FCC’s comments page with tirades against a two-tiered Internet (which caused the site to crash).

The Mega-spies on Megaupload

Thu, 01/29/2015 - 13:59 -- Eva Prkachin

Have you ever used Megaupload or Rapidshare to store or share files online? Because if you have used those services, or any of over 100 other popular file hosting services, there’s a very good chance that agents at Canada’s spy agency CSEC have been rifling through your private, personal uploads.

A report from The Intercept revealed that Canadian spies conducted surveillance on files that people upload using services like Rapidshare and Megaupload. Glenn Greenwald and Ryan Gallagher report that CSEC analyzed between 10 and 15 million downloads per day from the popular file-sharing services.

Despite the huge volume of data vacuumed up in the effort, the spy agency only deemed 350 download events “interesting” - only 0.00001% of the total files swept up for examination.

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